Longhorn Beetle

Unusual sightings of scarce species, unusual behaviour of species, or new species to the Cheshire region can be reported here for all to enjoy.

Longhorn Beetle

Postby anno on Fri Jul 23, 2010 3:16 pm

Whilst filming for the project on Widnes Warf I came across a species of Longhorn Beetle, a female Leptura quadrifasciata which was quite alarming as it looks like a big Hornet initially !

When I had calmed down we filmed it on my hand, and i got some of my usual stunning 'record' shots - one of which could be attached (fingers crossed!).

Over to you guys: Steve, Don, et al - is it Rare/Local, anything (?) - we need to know about its ecology ?
How cool is Biodiversity - its going in RODIS when confirmed, along with lots of Gatekeepers and Dunlin. ;)

Attachments
crop shot.JPG
A Four-banded Longhorn Beetle (Leptura quadrifasciata)
(Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).
anno
 
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Re: longhorn beetle

Postby SteveMcBill on Fri Jul 23, 2010 9:39 pm

Anno,

It certainly looks like the Four-banded Longhorn Beetle (Leptura quadrifasciata) to me.

Check at the following sites:

http://www.bioimages.org.uk/html/p7/p76535.php

http://www.wildaboutbritain.co.uk/forums/insects-and-invertebrates/15425-beetle-possible-longhorn.html

http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Leptura_%28Leptura%29_quadrifasciata

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=no&u=http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leptura_quadrifasciata&ei=Mf1JTN3HLYKQjAe6y-DXDA&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CBwQ7gEwAg&prev=/search%3Fq%3DLeptura%2Bquadrifasciata%2Bwiki%26hl%3Den%26biw%3D1307%26bih%3D826%26gbv%3D2

The typical elytral pattern of Leptura quadrifasciata is black with four transverse testaceous macula but these may vary in extent and in extreme cases the elytra are black with a small yellow humeral spot (Bily and Mehl).

Two species may be casually mistaken for quadrifasciata :- In Judolia sexmaculata (L.) the elytra are black with three transverse yellow marks and rounded apically. A mostly northern Scottish species.

In Leptura aurulenta the legs and basal antennal segments are red and the anterior and posterior margins of the pronotum are fringed with yellow pubescence. A rare southern, mostly near coastal, species.

Steve :)
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Re: longhorn beetle

Postby anno on Fri Jul 23, 2010 10:31 pm

Cheers Steve - any ideas on distribution?
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Re: longhorn beetle

Postby SteveMcBill on Fri Jul 23, 2010 10:51 pm

Anno,

You may be pleased to hear that there are NO records of the Four-banded Longhorn (Leptura quadrifasciata) on the rECOrd database.

The commoner yellow and black Longhorn in the County is Rutpela maculata for which there are 24 records on the rECOrd database though a few of them are not for Cheshire.

Sadly I cannot check the distribution in the rest of the North West for Leptura quadrifasciata at the moment as the NBN Gateway appears to be down.

Cheers

Steve :)
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Re: longhorn beetle

Postby anno on Fri Jul 23, 2010 11:00 pm

NBN gateway has been down all evening - already checked!!

We should have some decent film footage of this individual too - thanks for your help, as ever mate!

I didn't think it was Rutpela - the markings where very distinct and regimented/uniform - goodo!!
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Re: longhorn beetle

Postby anno on Fri Jul 30, 2010 1:56 pm

OK - quick update! here is a screenshot from our film - featuring a screen capture from Dreamcatcher Films, and a much better shot for Identing...

Attachments
Beetle.JPG
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Re: longhorn beetle

Postby anno on Fri Jul 30, 2010 1:58 pm

Last shot shows another couple of things - a Diptera with very 'Pyschedelic' eyes, and the fact that my freckles are more noticeable in Summer...

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Re: longhorn beetle

Postby SteveMcBill on Fri Jul 30, 2010 6:58 pm

Anno,

The Dipteron is a Tabanid fly - a Chrysops - possibly Chrysops caecutiens (thought there are a few species it could be and I would need it under the microscope to key it out).

See here: http://www.diptera.info/forum/viewthread.php?thread_id=31930

Cheers

Steve :)

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Re: longhorn beetle

Postby anno on Fri Jul 30, 2010 7:41 pm

Cheers for that Steve - it didn't hang around, so I was presently surprised when it got on the shot with our waspy friend, thats a great link by the way.

The current activities on the Warf should give us some good data from an under-recorded site, the quadrats have been out to survey plant species and it seems quite diverse insect wise, so it should make for some good records that will hopefully inform the future management in terms of baseline data.

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