Ichneumon for Identification

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Ichneumon for Identification

Postby anno on Mon Aug 30, 2010 9:50 am

Ichneumon for Identification:

Netelia testacea is a possibility,but I would have expected the back of the abdomen to be dark - any ideas?


Image
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Re: Ichneumon for Identification

Postby anno on Fri Sep 03, 2010 11:04 am

Come on people - I wanna put it in RODIS... ;)
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Re: Ichneumon for Identification

Postby PaulMartinHill on Sun Sep 05, 2010 7:06 pm

Wish I could help Anno, but beyond my area of expertise - try me with some grasshoppers!! :D Seriously though is this an order that really needs keying out under a microscope to determine ID?
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Re: Ichneumon for Identification

Postby anno on Mon Sep 06, 2010 12:01 pm

cheers Paul - can anyone point me in the direction of a good key - found several websites with Galleries but nothing more specific...

unfortunately the nearest i get to Grasshoppers is usually the crickets (silent brown 4's) that i feed to my various lizards - can send pictures if required ;)
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Re: Ichneumon for Identification

Postby SteveMcBill on Mon Sep 06, 2010 1:49 pm

Anno,

Hymenoptera Parasitica are notoriously difficult and personally I find very few identifiable using the RES Key even when I know what they are.

However, I used to run a junior entomological group called the UnderWings at Liverpool Museum and at that time a young lad used to visit the Museum as though it was his home. Carl Clee took him under his wing and taught him a LOT about Aculeate Hymenoptera. The young lad's name was Gavin Broad. So keen was Gavin that he even arranged to be dropped on Puffin Island by a local fisherman and ran a moth trap there through the night whilst surrounded by rats.

Gavin went off to Uni and when he graduated got a job with BRC at Monks Wood where he specialised in Hymenoptera Parasitica and became the National Recorder for such. A few years ago he was requesting specimens of orange Ophion type ichneumons to be sent to him as he was assiduously working on a key to them. During the work he found a number of new species to science hidden amongst the commoner species. I don't know whether Gavin finished his key or whether he is still working on it but I am certain he would always be receptive of specimens for checking and/or identification. I will mail you the last e-mail address I have for him - off Forum.

Hope it helps.

Cheers

Steve
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Re: Ichneumon for Identification

Postby anno on Tue Sep 07, 2010 7:31 pm

As you now know Steve, the youngster did well for himself and sends his regards - a reply;

Hi Anno,
Your ichneumonid is a species of Ophion, almost certainly Ophion luteus, if it was photographed in the last few days. Many (most) species of Ophion are routinely called Ophion luteus but your specimen looks like the real O. luteus, which is on the wing generally from the second half of August through much of September and is common and widespread.

Dr Gavin Broad
Senior Curator (Hymenoptera)
Department of Entomology
The Natural History Museum,

Blimey - what a top guy!! :)
P.S.: I better put it in Rodis...
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Re: Ichneumon for Identification

Postby SteveMcBill on Tue Sep 07, 2010 9:27 pm

Great stuff Anno. I'm very glad Gavin was able to provide you with the identification you were after.

Please do put it into RODIS with Gavin as the Determiner. He may have said it is a common species (and it is) but we have so few records of the parasitic Hymenoptera on the database and so very few recorders working the group that any records at all are valuable. A pity we cannot encourage more people to take up the Hymenoptera Parasitica and to become even slightly expert in the field.

SO, what else unusual can you find next ??

Steve
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